Relistor is used to treat constipation caused by opioids in adults with long-lasting (chronic) non-cancer pain.

Relistor is used to treat constipation caused by opioids in adults with long-lasting (chronic) pain.

Could it be OIC?

Time to Check Your Gut

 
What is OIC?

Opioid-induced onstipation (OIC) is a unique type of constipation that is a side effect of taking opioid pain medication

While opioids can effectively relieve pain, they may have an undesired effect in the gut, or bowels, causing constipation. This can make it difficult for you to have bowel movements. The constipation you experience may be OIC. OIC can last the entire time you continue taking your opioid medication. It is not likely to improve over time or with a change in opioid dose.
Some examples of opioids that can cause OIC include codeine, hydrocodone, morphine, oxycodone, fentanyl, and tramadol.

Use the slider below to indicate how frustrated you are about your opioid-induced constipation.

You seem to be ok. But still check in with your healthcare provider.

OIC is common

You are not alone

Many people who take opioid pain medicine may become constipated. It's just not everyone may talk about it!

40% - 80%

of patients taking opioids for long-lasting (chronic) pain may experience opioid-induced constipation (OIC)

 

OIC symptoms can include:

Not having bowel movements Regularly (less than 3 per week)

Needing to push harder during a bowel movement

Dry, hard stools

Sense of incomplete emptying of your bowels

Bloating or pain in your stomach area

Experiencing any of the above symptoms while taking an opioid?

It could be time to bring that conversation to your healthcare provider. Especially if you have tried over-the-counter (OTC) options and are not satisfied.

OTC laxatives and OIC

Feel like you've Tried everything for your OIC?

Why you may require a specific kind of treatment

Opioid-induced constipation is different from other types of constipation. It may not always be relieved by routine constipation treatment methods such as OTC laxatives, diet changes, and exercise.
In one survey, ~8 out of 10 patients reported still being constipated from opioids while taking laxatives.

If OTC laxatives are not working for your OIC, you are not alone

OTC laxatives are intended for the treatment of occasional constipation, but are generally not meant for long-term use

Some OTC laxatives should not be taken for longer than a week without consulting your healthcare provider

Some common OTC laxatives include Miralax®, Colace®, and Senokot®

All trademarks are the properties of their respective owners.

Taking over-the-counter laxatives for OIC? Tell your healthcare provider.
This information will help them help you, so make sure to mention it at your next appointment!

Talk to your healthcare provider about OIC and RELISTOR

Challenge your opioid-induced constipation

Healthcare providers know that opioid-induced constipation is a real issue—they just might not know that you’re suffering from it. By letting your healthcare provider know what you're experiencing, he or she can help make sure you get the right kind of prescription medication for opioid-induced constipation.
Check it off. Schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider.

Indications

RELISTOR® is a prescription medicine used to treat constipation in adults that is caused by prescription pain medicines called opioids.

  • RELISTOR tablets and RELISTOR injection are used to treat constipation caused by opioids in adults with long-lasting (chronic) pain that is not caused by active cancer.
  • RELISTOR injection is also used to treat constipation caused by opioids in adults with advanced illness or pain caused by active cancer and who need increases in their opioid dose for comfort care.

It is not known if RELISTOR is safe and effective in children.

Important Safety Information

  • Do not take Relistor if you have a bowel blockage (called an intestinal obstruction) or have a history of bowel blockage.
  • Relistor can cause serious side effects such as a tear in your stomach or intestinal wall (perforation). Stomach pain that is severe can be a sign of a serious medical condition. If you get stomach pain that is severe, does not go away, or gets worse, stop taking Relistor and get emergency medical help right away.
  • Stop using Relistor and call your healthcare provider if you get diarrhea that is severe or that does not go away during treatment with Relistor.
  • You may have symptoms of opioid withdrawal during treatment with Relistor including sweating, chills, diarrhea, stomach pain, anxiety, and yawning. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any of these symptoms.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you have kidney or liver problems.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you have any stomach or bowel (intestines) problems, including stomach ulcer, Crohn’s disease, diverticulitis, cancer of the stomach or bowel, or Ogilvie’s syndrome.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Taking Relistor during pregnancy may cause opioid withdrawal symptoms in your unborn baby. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you become pregnant during treatment with Relistor.
  • Taking Relistor while you are breastfeeding may cause opioid withdrawal in your baby. You should not breastfeed during treatment with Relistor. You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will take Relistor or breastfeed. You should not do both.
  • Also, tell your healthcare provider about all of the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.
  • In a clinical study, the most common side effects of Relistor tablets in people with long-lasting (chronic) pain that is not caused by cancer include: stomach-area (abdomen) pain, diarrhea, headache, swelling or a feeling of fullness or pressure in your abdomen, sweating, anxiety, muscle spasms, runny nose, and chills.
  • In a clinical study, the most common side effects of Relistor injection in people with long-lasting (chronic) pain that is not caused by cancer include: stomach-area (abdomen) pain, nausea, diarrhea, sweating, hot flush, tremor, and chills.
  • In clinical studies, the most common side effects of Relistor injection in people receiving treatment for their advanced illness include: stomach-area (abdomen) pain, gas, nausea, dizziness, and diarrhea.

You are encouraged to report side effects of prescription drugs to FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For product information, adverse event reports, and product complaint reports, please contact:

Salix Product Information Call Center
Phone: 1-800-321-4576
Fax: 1-510-595-8183
Email: salixmc@dlss.com

Please click here for full Prescribing Information for RELISTOR tablets and RELISTOR injection, including medication guide.

What is Relistor?

RELISTOR® is a prescription medicine used to treat constipation in adults that is caused by prescription pain medicines called opioids.

  • RELISTOR tablets and RELISTOR injection are used to treat constipation caused by opioids in adults with long-lasting (chronic) pain that is not caused by active cancer.
  • RELISTOR injection is also used to treat constipation caused by opioids in adults with advanced illness or pain caused by active cancer and who need increases in their opioid dose for comfort care.

It is not known if RELISTOR is safe and effective in children.

Important Safety Information

  • Do not take Relistor if you have a bowel blockage (called an intestinal obstruction) or have a history of bowel blockage.
  • Relistor can cause serious side effects such as a tear in your stomach or intestinal wall (perforation). Stomach pain that is severe can be a sign of a serious medical condition. If you get stomach pain that is severe, does not go away, or gets worse, stop taking Relistor and get emergency medical help right away.
  • Stop using Relistor and call your healthcare provider if you get diarrhea that is severe or that does not go away during treatment with Relistor.
  • You may have symptoms of opioid withdrawal during treatment with Relistor including sweating, chills, diarrhea, stomach pain, anxiety, and yawning. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any of these symptoms.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you have kidney or liver problems.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you have any stomach or bowel (intestines) problems, including stomach ulcer, Crohn’s disease, diverticulitis, cancer of the stomach or bowel, or Ogilvie’s syndrome.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Taking Relistor during pregnancy may cause opioid withdrawal symptoms in your unborn baby. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you become pregnant during treatment with Relistor.
  • Taking Relistor while you are breastfeeding may cause opioid withdrawal in your baby. You should not breastfeed during treatment with Relistor. You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will take Relistor or breastfeed. You should not do both.
  • Also, tell your healthcare provider about all of the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.
  • In a clinical study, the most common side effects of Relistor tablets in people with long-lasting (chronic) pain that is not caused by cancer include: stomach-area (abdomen) pain, diarrhea, headache, swelling or a feeling of fullness or pressure in your abdomen, sweating, anxiety, muscle spasms, runny nose, and chills.
  • In a clinical study, the most common side effects of Relistor injection in people with long-lasting (chronic) pain that is not caused by cancer include: stomach-area (abdomen) pain, nausea, diarrhea, sweating, hot flush, tremor, and chills.
  • In clinical studies, the most common side effects of Relistor injection in people receiving treatment for their advanced illness include: stomach-area (abdomen) pain, gas, nausea, dizziness, and diarrhea.

You are encouraged to report side effects of prescription drugs to FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For product information, adverse event reports, and product complaint reports, please contact:

Salix Product Information Call Center
Phone: 1-800-321-4576
Fax: 1-510-595-8183
Email: salixmc@dlss.com

Please click here for full Prescribing Information for RELISTOR tablets and RELISTOR injection, including medication guide.

What is Relistor?

RELISTOR® is a prescription medicine used to treat constipation in adults that is caused by prescription pain medicines called opioids.

  • RELISTOR tablets and RELISTOR injection are used to treat constipation caused by opioids in adults with long-lasting (chronic) pain that is not caused by active cancer.
  • RELISTOR injection is also used to treat constipation caused by opioids in adults with advanced illness or pain caused by active cancer and who need increases in their opioid dose for comfort care.

It is not known if RELISTOR is safe and effective in children.

Important Safety Information

  • Do not take Relistor if you have a bowel blockage (called an intestinal obstruction) or have a history of bowel blockage.
  • Relistor can cause serious side effects such as a tear in your stomach or intestinal wall (perforation). Stomach pain that is severe can be a sign of a serious medical condition. If you get stomach pain that is severe, does not go away, or gets worse, stop taking Relistor and get emergency medical help right away.
  • Stop using Relistor and call your healthcare provider if you get diarrhea that is severe or that does not go away during treatment with Relistor.
  • You may have symptoms of opioid withdrawal during treatment with Relistor including sweating, chills, diarrhea, stomach pain, anxiety, and yawning. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any of these symptoms.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you have kidney or liver problems.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you have any stomach or bowel (intestines) problems, including stomach ulcer, Crohn’s disease, diverticulitis, cancer of the stomach or bowel, or Ogilvie’s syndrome.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Taking Relistor during pregnancy may cause opioid withdrawal symptoms in your unborn baby. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you become pregnant during treatment with Relistor.
  • Taking Relistor while you are breastfeeding may cause opioid withdrawal in your baby. You should not breastfeed during treatment with Relistor. You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will take Relistor or breastfeed. You should not do both.
  • Also, tell your healthcare provider about all of the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.
  • In a clinical study, the most common side effects of Relistor tablets in people with long-lasting (chronic) pain that is not caused by cancer include: stomach-area (abdomen) pain, diarrhea, headache, swelling or a feeling of fullness or pressure in your abdomen, sweating, anxiety, muscle spasms, runny nose, and chills.
  • In a clinical study, the most common side effects of Relistor injection in people with long-lasting (chronic) pain that is not caused by cancer include: stomach-area (abdomen) pain, nausea, diarrhea, sweating, hot flush, tremor, and chills.
  • In clinical studies, the most common side effects of Relistor injection in people receiving treatment for their advanced illness include: stomach-area (abdomen) pain, gas, nausea, dizziness, and diarrhea.

You are encouraged to report side effects of prescription drugs to FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For product information, adverse event reports, and product complaint reports, please contact:

Salix Product Information Call Center
Phone: 1-800-321-4576
Fax: 1-510-595-8183
Email: salixmc@dlss.com

Please click here for full Prescribing Information for RELISTOR tablets and RELISTOR injection, including medication guide.